CampusFit

Interactive wellness education exclusively for Gallagher Student Health & Special Risk students

Interactive wellness education exclusively for Gallagher Student Health & Special Risk students

Interactive wellness education exclusively for Gallagher Student Health & Special Risk students

Fitness Standards

Test your Fitness. Of course a full work-up by a certified trainer is great; however, assessing your fitness doesn't have to be an involved process. Take five minutes to try these techniques - it's not even necessary to change into gym clothes. Remember to write down the results - we get what we measure (and document)! And, make a note to test yourself again in a month.

We haven't included standards for these tests, just try to steadily improve and achieve a reasonable goal. If you can only sit against the wall for 15 seconds, fine, take a month and see if you can increase the time. If you'd like to test yourself against standards, see the section below.

  • The Classic Wall Sit - Time how long you can "sit" against the wall. Simulate sitting in a chair, with your knees at a right angle. Keep your back against the wall, don't bend forward. This generally measures your leg endurance.

  • The Plank - Time how long you can hold the "plank" position. On a padded surface, rest on your elbows and toes, with your legs and trunk in a straight line (simulating a plank). The plank test assesses your core (back, abdominals, etc.) endurance.

  • Push Ups - Your hands should be one to two hand widths beyond the shoulders and elbows away from the body and toes are touching the floor. Descend to the point where the arms are parallel to the floor. Don't let your trunk "sway" towards the floor, or "round up" towards the ceiling. Count how many repetitions you can perform. If the regular push up is a little too hard, rest your body on your knees instead of your toes.

  • The Resting Heart Rate - The resting heart rate is a good general indicator of fitness. Take your heart rate first thing in the morning before getting out of bed. Write it down and watch it drop as strength and endurance exercise pay off!

Be a Marine! You're on the treadmill at the gym. The pace increases, the ramp elevates a few degrees as if you are on a hill, and your legs speed up the pace. The person on the treadmill next to you looks at you and all they see is another person on a treadmill slogging through a workout. But in your mind, you're a US Marine running ashore looking for a lost buddy in an unknown zone. Or maybe you're an FBI agent, pursuing a kidnapper on foot. Or how about a relief worker looking for stranded people and pets after a devastating hurricane.

Sometimes it's fun--and motivating--to pretend that you are aiming to be an elite fitness machine. So we provide these standards from renowned organizations. Use them to motivate and evaluate your fitness.

You Get What You Measure. And, it's really easy to avoid measuring the status of your personal fitness level. It takes time and attention, and of course, the results might not be what you'd want! However, jot down and perhaps even take the time to graph the exercise you do each week; it's a proven technique to increase fitness!

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